Robert Myles McDonnell

3 minute read

I really don’t like splitting data into ‘train’ and ‘test’. I don’t mean that I’m against the idea of it, though you could say it’s a waste of data that could be used to better your model, but I mean that actual assignment in R of ‘train’ and ‘test’. I always liked destructuring in Python, and I like it a lot in 2018 JavaScript, so when I remembered that the zeallot package has it, I thought it would be a good opportunity to see how that could fit in a tidy modelling pipeline.

Robert Myles McDonnell

4 minute read

🇨🇨 🇨🇽 🇵🇹 🇩🇴 🇫🇲 🇰🇷 Recently I wrote a little package for R called flagfillr (you can read more details here). One of the main reasons I made this is because I had seen a few maps of economic partners, for example this one, from here: These types of maps (some more here, of the US) are interesting visual summaries, but they look a little Excel to me (sorry, whoever made it!

Robert Myles McDonnell

4 minute read

(This turned out to be a bit of a ramble, for the code go here 😄)

My PhD thesis focused on latent variable models as a way to model legislative voting behaviour. The main model I used is called the Bayesian Item Response model, and the idea is that, from the observed votes of the legislators, we can build a scale on which we can place them, relative to one another.